MESSIER 5

MESSIER 5

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Falsoe-color image of M5. Image taken from Al Sadeem Observatory with Meade LX850 16 inches telescope and SBIG STT-8300M CCD camera.

Black and White image of M5. Image taken from Al Sadeem Observatory with Meade LX850 16 inches telescope and SBIG STT-8300M CCD camera.

 

Messier 5 (M5) is a bright globular cluster can be seen in the northern constellation Serpens.

The cluster located at a distance of 24,500 light years from Earth, in the galactic halo of the Milky Way. It is designation as NGC 5904 in the New General Catalogue.

M5 has an apparent magnitude of 6.65, and it can be seen without binoculars, only under extremely dark skies and it only viewed as a faint star near the star 5 Serpentis. M5 revealed as a fuzzy patch of light with binocular, and it will show a bright glowing core on a small telescopes.

Individual stars will only appear in larger telescopes, starting with 4-inch instruments, which reveal the cluster’s brightest stars. The best time to observe M5 is in the months of March, April and May.

The globular cluster Messier 5, shown here in Al Sadeem Observatory image, is one of the oldest belonging to the Milky Way. The majority of its stars formed more than 12 billion years ago, but there are some unexpected newcomers on the scene, adding some vitality to this aging population. Stars in globular clusters form in the same stellar nursery and grow old together. The most massive stars age quickly, exhausting their fuel supply in less than a million years, and end their lives in spectacular supernovae explosions.

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