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C/2018 W2 Africano

Here’s C/2018 W2 Africano imaged using SBIG STT-8300MM CCD with Johnson V filter, Meade LX850 16 inch SCT last September 11, 2019. Its apparent magnitude was measured at +11.6 at the date and time of capture. read more

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Comet C/2018 N2 (ASASSN)

Comet C/2018 N2 (ASASSN) (center) taken from Al Sadeem Observatory last September 10, 2019, using GSO RC8 telescope and ZWO1600MC camera. Comet’s apparent magnitude is at +12.82 at the date and time of capture. read more

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SUNSPOT MONITORING – MARCH 11, 2020

Here are today’s solar images taken from Al Sadeem Observatory, March 11, 2020.

The sky was generally clear but with intermittent moderate winds which provided good transparency but average seeing at the time these images were taken. read more

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Betelgeuse

Betelgeuse is a bright red supergiant in the Orion constellation located between 400-650 light-years away. With an average apparent magnitude of +0.4, it is previously the 9th brightest star in the night sky. read more

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Epsilon Aurigae

We got an interesting gem in the Auriga constellation— Epsilon Aurigae, an unusual eclipsing binary star that remained a mystery to scientists and experts in the field of #astronomy for over two centuries! read more

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2000QL7

2000QL7 is an Amor-class near-Earth asteroid which was discovered independently by the LINEAR survey in August 2000 but it was first observed on July 21, 1977, at Siding Spring Observatory.   read more

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1991 DG

1991 DG is an Apollo-class potential hazardous near Earth-asteroid which was first observed by R. H. McNaught from Siding Spring Observatory on Feb. 20, 1991. read more

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FEBRUARY 2020 AL SADEEM SKY-LENDAR: A Supermoon and more planet-Moon pairings

The Moon and some prominent planets will rule our February night sky this year, and to keep up with the love season, these celestial objects will be often seen in “pairs”!

Keep your eyes peeled for planets such as Venus and Uranus, which will be immediately visible at the western section of the sky right after sunset until 9 in the evening. Other bright planets Mars and Jupiter can be observed before dawn at 4 AM and 5 AM, respectively, until sunrise. Planets that will be no-shows for February are Mercury, Saturn, and Neptune.

The “love month” will also be peppered with prominent winter constellations and deep-sky objects like the Great Orion Nebula, the Flame and Horsehead nebulas, Andromeda Galaxy, and the brilliant open star cluster Pleiades known as the “Seven Sisters.” read more

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SUNSPOT MONITORING – JANUARY 18, 2020

Here are today’s solar images taken from Al Sadeem Observatory, January 18, 2020.

The sky was generally clear with intermittent light to moderate winds which provided good transparency but average seeing at the time these images were taken. read more

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Comet 2I/Borisov

Some snaps of Comet 2I/Borisov with measured magnitude at +17.1 (gradually brightening)!

This rocky visitor may still ring new to anyone’s ears, since it was only recently discovered on August 30 by Ukrainian amateur astronomer Gennady Borisov, but it is not a comet to be taken lightly. read more